Sinikka's snippets

Finland and travelling, a woman's life, cultures, languages, photography plus family recipes

Finnish pancake

4 Comments

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First off, I need to explain that here in Finland ‘pancake‘ (Finnish ‘pannukakku‘ – literally a direct translation of the English word) is prepared as one big square on a baking tray in the oven. This is then cut into small square pieces for serving. The mixture is the same as for ‘crèpes’ that are round, thin and fried individually on a frying pan. We do make crèpes, too, but sometimes it’s easier and quicker to just prepare the whole lot in one go in the oven. This sometimes gets confusing with English speakers who have a very different concept of what ‘a pancake’ should look like. My British husband, for example, would say the Finnish pancake is more like their Yorkshire pudding although, of course, we would not eat our pancake with main course meat. As for the American pancakes, I would rather call them ‘thick crèpes’ – crazy Finns, right? It makes sense, though, when you know that the Finnish words for ‘crèpes’ (‘letut‘, ‘lätyt‘, ‘ohukkaat‘) all somehow refer to their thinness above all.

Both the pancake and crèpes are common summer cottage fare over here. Finnish cottages tend to be rather basic and rustic, often without a lot of mod cons. That’s why, we Finns usually want to keep cooking there as simple as possible. An oven pancake or crèpes are ideal as they require very few ingredients. I’ve sometimes seen crèpes fried on a pan on a small camping gas bottle at a cottage.

A pancake is nice and homely comfort food that everybody usually enjoys, children especially. It is usually served as a dessert after a soup, for example. In fact, the Finnish conscript army has given us the tradition of having pea soup and pancake on the menu on Thursdays (I really don’t know why that weekend was chosen!). This tradition is often followed for in school canteens during the school year. In our family, a pancake used to be an evening snack when our daughter was small. And if there are any leftovers, they taste just as good cold for breakfast the next morning!

We prefer our pancake with strawberry jam but it works just as well with fresh berries, and even added whipped cream if you like. I must say that I much prefer the fancier toppings for crèpes, though. The American favorite, maple syrup, is not commonly used here in Finland. Instead, some Finns just like their piece of pancake with only a bit of sprinkled sugar on top.

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INGREDIENTS (for one baking tray, c. 20 pieces)

  • 4 eggs
  • 2 tbsp sugar
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 l milk
  • 5 1/2 – 6 dl ordinary wheat flour (not self-raising)
  • 1/2-1 dl melted butter

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THIS IS WHAT YOU DO

  • in a bowl, beat the eggs, sugar and salt
  • add the milk
  • add the flour little by little
  • to finish with, add the melted butter
  • let the mixture stand for 30 minutes
  • line the baking tray with a grease-proof baking sheet
  • pour the mixture on the tray
  • bake at 225° Celsius for 15 minutes first, then lower the temperature to 200-175° Celsius and bake for another 15 minutes, or until the top and bottom are beautifully brown
  • cut into pieces and enjoy with a topping of your choice

SIMPLY DELICIOUS!

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Author: sinikka

From Finland to the world, I teach English and French and try to be a model of a lifelong learner to my students, I love nature and photography, and enjoy travelling

4 thoughts on “Finnish pancake

  1. Thank you for this great recipe Sinikka! I just tried it and I think this is the best recipe so far (and I’ve made a few pannukakku’s in my life, LOL!). I posted a pic on my Instagram if you want to check it out, I hope this link works:

    My friend in San Fransisco tried it too (she’s not Finnish and has never had pannukakku) and liked it as well! 😀

    I highly recommend this recipe to anyone who has a sweet tooth. xx

    Like

  2. Wow! A lot easier than my grandma’s Swedish pancakes made in that tedious way with the special pan! When it is not 37 degrees in Rome I will try this!

    Like

    • Yes, this is a really simple recipe. I wonder if your grandmother had the same pan as we sometimes use here in Finland, with several small circles on it? That sure is time-consuming – although, very nice, too.

      Like

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